1st Gen R53 Cooper S Copper-based anti-seize required for plugs?

Discussion in '1st Generation: 2002–06 R50, R53 & 2004–08 R52' started by Ofioliti, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. Ofioliti

    Ofioliti New Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Hi folks,

    I am planning on changing my spark plugs soon. In the Bentley manual it says to use copper-based anti-seize on the threads. I have some gray-colored anti-seize, but it doesn't say on the container what's in it.

    Is the copper-based stuff necessary? Why?

    Thanks!
     
  2. wzabrouski

    wzabrouski Active Member

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    Hi temp? I got the same stuff yesterday.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. Ofioliti

    Ofioliti New Member

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    Woah, you're quick. :lol:

    My gray stuff says it can be used for spark plugs, so maybe it's OK. :confused5:
     
  4. Metalman

    Metalman Well-Known Member
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    I would be real careful and use the correct stuff. I'm a little fuzzy on this, but I seem to remember the wrong coating will mess up your O2 sensor or maybe the catalytic converter?
     
  5. RonsMinnie

    RonsMinnie New Member
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    My MINI Guru friend says the trick is just to apply a very small amount above the 2nd thread of the plug -- ie -- no anti seize in the combustion chamber.
     
  6. Minidave

    Minidave Well-Known Member
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    Your guru is right.......

    But I've never had a plug sieze in the head in the 45 years I've been working on engines. Clean threads and proper torque is all I've ever needed......
     
  7. Ofioliti

    Ofioliti New Member

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    Thanks for the info/tips, guys.

    (I did some searching on the web and there doesn't seem to be anything definitive on why copper-based anti-seize might need to be used. :confused5:)
     
  8. BThayer23

    BThayer23 Well-Known Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the anti-seize works to prevent galling between the dissimilar metals of the aluminum head and the steel spark plug threads. The gray stuff is fine to use. Just a apply a very thin coat to the spark plug threads and stay away from the last couple threads. No chunks, no brush hairs, either.

    You can avoid the issue of galling by changing your spark plugs every 50k or so. Also, removal technique is important: once you break the plug loose with the first turn, keep turning with a smooth steady motion and don't stop. This is important if you haven't changed them say, for 100 or 120k miles. And this is also a relatively new phenomenon with the widespread use of aluminum heads to save weight.
     
  9. Nitrominis

    Nitrominis Banned

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    Anti seize is a good idea with any thread especially when working with aluminum. The exception in required dry area's or no chemical lubricants of operational parts. Not sure why there is a concern for getting a little in the combustion chamber (lol) it will burn. (see combustion temps.) But if you get it on the grounding electrode you might cause the spark plug to foul or not fire? As for copper not sure why you would have any deliberate use for it around anything automotive? Can't really hurt anything it is just not used though! If you look into it the use it is rated more for stainless steel and were regulation apply for chemical uses such as in hospitals or Nuclear power plants. LOL?
    As for anti seize and the 02 sensors I believe if you look into that it is with sealants like silicone where you should make certain they are all sensor safe. lol Most 02 sensors comes with anti seize already applied to the threads and a protective cap to preserve the aniti seize for installation!
     
  10. lotsie

    lotsie Club Coordinator

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    My plugs came with their own anti-seize. Got them from Waylan.

    Mark
     
  11. lotsie

    lotsie Club Coordinator

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    Just remembered, the MINI tech at the dealer up in Winnipeg used copper based anti-seize on the back side of wheels when re-mounting them. I just use regular silver coloured stuff.

    Mark
     
  12. Dr Obnxs

    Dr Obnxs New Member

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    The grey stuff

    is Moly di-sulfide, I think. It's really good stuff. One jar should last a lifetime!

    Matt
     
  13. Nitrominis

    Nitrominis Banned

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    Well I went out look into my shop supplies and found not only my regular but a large container of cooper anti seize. So I guess I might have a deliberate use for it....:blush2: :lol:

    Here is what the cooper anti seize container says. So it is a good thing on plugs, sensors brakes.........


    A premium quality copper anti-seize and thread lubricant that may be used to prevent seizing, corrosion and galling where high temperature conditions exist.
     
  14. Nitrominis

    Nitrominis Banned

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    Funny you mention this I bought a lb. way back in the early 80s and still have some! In its raw MOLIBNIUM di-sulfide (Moly lube) it is a fine powder that can be mixed with just about anything.
    Works great mixing a little with oil as a more liquid assembly lube.
     
  15. Ofioliti

    Ofioliti New Member

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    OK, this is the stuff I used:

    [​IMG]

    "Permatex® Anti-Seize Lubricant

    A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing and to assure easier disassembly. Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F (-51°Cto 871°C)."

    I used a tiny bit. The plugs went in much smoother than when they came out. I guess things are OK. :Thumbsup:
     
  16. Nitrominis

    Nitrominis Banned

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    :Thumbsup:



    Next thread about plugs the proper way to power gap and choose the correct heat range....Titiled "Minis Not all engines are the same":lol:
     

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