1st Gen R50 Cooper Over torqued oil drain plug.

Discussion in '1st Generation: 2002–06 R50, R53 & 2004–08 R52' started by interzonearts, Nov 5, 2015.

  1. interzonearts

    interzonearts New Member

    Jul 2, 2015
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    I had my last oil change done and when i tried to unscrew the oil plug yesterday i just couldn't do it. Even a six point socket would strip the bolt.
    How do i get the sucker out?
     
  2. BruceK

    BruceK Active Member

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    Take it back to whomever did the dirty deed and have them fix the problem?
     
  3. caseydog

    caseydog Well-Known Member

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    I hope you didn't go to one of those Jiffy-Kwic-Lub and Carwash places. They seem to love to over-tighten drain plugs and oil filters. My wife took her car to one, against my advice, and they cross-treaded the drain plug.

    Was the engine cold when you tried to take the plug out? That might help, since the plug will contract a very tiny bit.

    If it looks like you are going to ruin the plug getting it out, you may want to have a replacement plug on hand, unless you have a second car to drive to the parts store.

    Good luck.

    CD
     
  4. Minidave

    Minidave Well-Known Member
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    I've used a variety of strategies but a lot depends on how deep your tool box is......I've used a zip gun with a cold chisel tip, I've hammered on a 1/2" socket (1/2" drive) and used a breaker bar, and when they're rounded over completely I've welded a nut over the stub and then it comes out easily.

    I do not understand why people feel the need to put these in so tight - factory spec is only 22 ft lbs IIRC.
     
  5. interzonearts

    interzonearts New Member

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    It was valvoline.

    My initial thought was to go there but it's at least an hour drive to the place.

    I do have a couple of autopart stores within biking distance :) which came handy this summer when our mini's alternator gave up and our truck's starter got busted on the next or so day.

    I'm gonna try the 1/2'' socket next.
     
  6. MCS02

    MCS02 Moderator
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    #6 MCS02, Nov 6, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015
    You need to get a 6 point socket that is designed like a snapon. They use to have the patten but now others have the same design. If you look at the inside of the socket it is rounded so it makes contact on the flats of the bolt not the corners like a 12 or normal 6 point.
    The time of design will not round off the bolt and mini times will remove a rounded one.
     

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  7. gjxj

    gjxj Member

    Jun 16, 2015
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    actually, i think the opposite. Aluminum pan expands more than steel plug, so it should be looser hot.
     
  8. Crashton

    Crashton Club Coordinator

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    My take is that the problem is the rubber/vinyl gasket on the plug compresses & when over tightened it can be a real bear. My technique: Get a sock jammed on there with a breaker bar. Hit the breaker bar with a dead blow hammer. A sharp strike should loosen the plug. If the plug is too gnawed up for a socket try a set of large vice-grips & then a whack.

    Good luck & buy a new drain plug.
     
  9. Canusrufis

    Canusrufis RMW Powered R53
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  10. Crashton

    Crashton Club Coordinator

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    I have some of those & that's not a bad idea. I'd still give the wrench a smack with a dead blow hammer.
     
  11. interzonearts

    interzonearts New Member

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    I do have a set of blu point sockets which are a cheaper version of snap on so the contour should be the same.

    I didn't have time to deal with the plug today but i'll try to find some tomorrow. My thoughts right now are 6 point socket on a 2' breaker bar with a warm engine. If that doesn't work i'll order the bolt extractors Canusrufis suggested, they seem like something i'd like to have anyways.
     
  12. Minidave

    Minidave Well-Known Member
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    Don't bother with channel lock pliers or vice grips, they will not work. I also haven't had any luck smacking it with a hammer - but if you're gonna try it I'd use a steel ball pein hammer, not a plastic dead blow......

    Hope they didn't strip the threads or you'll be learning how to put in a heli-coil too.....

    Worst case you can pull the pan off and heat it with a torch.....
     
  13. BruceK

    BruceK Active Member

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    Or... Spend an hour driving back to the bozo who over tightened it and have them fix the situation.
     
  14. Minidave

    Minidave Well-Known Member
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    The biggest problem with that is they'll probably make the situation worse!

    Especially if it was an "Iffy Lube" that screwed it up.....
     
  15. Crashton

    Crashton Club Coordinator

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    I agree with Dave. If you do go bring that dead blow hammer with you. :)
     
  16. MCS02

    MCS02 Moderator
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    Yes defiantly the Dead Blow Hammer!!:devil:
     
  17. interzonearts

    interzonearts New Member

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    All my efforts resulted in a rounded up bolt, so i took it to a nearby mechanic who got it out for $40 which was not horrible.

    Anyways the point of this exercise was switching to winter oil - Royal Purple 10-30 VrOOm VrOOm.
     
  18. BruceK

    BruceK Active Member

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    Glad it got it worked out (pun intended).

    Winter oil? Huh?

    Different seasonal temperature is what multi-weight oil is designed to handle automatically.

    You should be using 5W-30 per the owner's manual, right? Or did MINI change it's recommendations for later cars?

    I definitely would not use thicker, more viscous oil in the winter.
     
  19. Minidave

    Minidave Well-Known Member
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    Yep, I run 5W30 year round, and it gets plenty cold here in winter - 10* below at times.....
     
  20. BruceK

    BruceK Active Member

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    Yeah, which brand of oil is up to personal preference (as long as it meets the requirements), but viscosity of the oil really isn't.

    If you want to treat your engine right, you've got to stick with the specification of the manufacturer. After all, they done the extensive testing under all the possible climate/engine load situations and come up with the very best solution, which is why they go to the trouble of specifying it in the owner's manual.

    I don't know where you live, but unless it is tropical, I would be concerned with the differences of the thicker 10W-30 vs. 5W-30 on starting on a cold winter day. The 10W-30 is just not going to flow as easily, or go through tight engine passages when the engine is cold, as 5W-30 will. That could cause additional wear or possibly other issues.

    (I'm basing the 5W-30 on MINI's clear recommendation for my '02 MINI, but if this has changed with later models, please inform me).
     

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