Tool for removing LCA bushings.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by M1N1, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. M1N1

    M1N1 Well-Known Member

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    #1 M1N1, Apr 15, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
    Tool for removing LCA bushings on the car.

    I decided to try and design/make a tool to remove and replace the LCA bushings on my Justa without having to take the carriers off the car.

    Before anyone says it, yes I know that there are tools available commercially on the interweb to do this. But where is the fun in that? I am a journeyman tool and die maker, I make things like this for a living. This works on an old, tried and tested engineering principle used by die makers/maintenance/millwrights/machine repairers for years to remove bushings or bearings without having to tear everything apart. I have myself fabricated tools like this ( on smaller scale) to remove stubborn buttons from a die.


    I purchased 2 carriers off of a wrecked R53 from M/A member maurodog to take measurements, and formulate a design. I have the students edition of Autocad on my laptop, so I started drawing.

    Part A is an end cap made from HRS, threaded thru the centre, and 25 thousandths smaller in diameter than the bushing to be removed. This allows the end cap to pull the bushing into the body (part B).
    Part B is the body, that is basically a tube. The inside diameter is about 20 thousandths bigger than the bushing, so that the bushing can be pulled into the body. The outside diameter is about the same size as the carrier. The body also provides support for the end cap (part C).
    Part C is an end cap that gives a basis to provide the force to pull the bushing. The outside diameter is the same as the body. It also has a smaller diameter step that is the same as the inner dia of the body, which centres everything. It has a clearance thru the centre for the threaded bar.
    The draw bolt is just a length of 5/8-11 pre-thread, with 2 nuts and washers.

    Pic 1 shows how the tool fits together. Pic 2 shows the setup on the carrier and bushing. Pic 3 shows the bushing pulled out of one of the carriers.

    This worked just fine on the bench, but I am going to check for clearance on the car to make sure it will work.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. M1N1

    M1N1 Well-Known Member

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    Homemade tool for removing LCA bushings on the car.

    Yesterday I made another end cap (part D). This will be used to press the outer part of the Powerflex bushing into the carrier. The outside diameter is the same as the carrier, and there is a recess machined into the front to allow the new bushing to come thru the carrier as it should. End cap (part C) is used to apply the pressure needed to push the new busing home.

    Pic 1 shows the new end cap, and pic 2 shows how it all fits together.
     

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  3. MCS02

    MCS02 Moderator
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    Looks good. But real men rip the sub frame out. Why? Because why do it the easy way when you can do it the hard way.:D
     
  4. Dave.0

    Dave.0 Helix & RMW Powered
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    Yup just like getting married a 2nd, 3rd or 4th time. :eek6::crazy:


    Great looking job on that LCA Bushing tool M1N1. :Thumbsup:
     
  5. M1N1

    M1N1 Well-Known Member

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    Just pulled the Justa onto the ramps, and checked the clearance between the end of the bushing and the underside of the floorpan. There is enough free space to get the end cap (A), and nut in there. End cap and nut together measure about 1 1/8 inches. :D :Thumbsup: Now I just have to find the time to do the deed. Why is it that work gets in the way of the fun stuff?
     
  6. Fastlane

    Fastlane Member

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    Wow....nice work! I made a "ghetto" version of your setup to insert the new bushings when I did mine. It worked, but took a few attempts to get the bushing to go in straight. Your rig is obviously much more stout and maybe you won't have the same issue, but i found that under the car...lying on the ground and working at an awkward angle, it was difficult to keep the new bushing from sliding in crooked and getting bound up. I found that by putting a large socket inside the bushing and then threading the tool through that helped keep the new bushing more centered on the tool while I cranked down on the nut. Again, maybe you won't have that issue, but if you do, maybe you could add another part to your tool that fits inside the new bushing to serve the same purpose.

    Good luck! Let us know how it works. I remember being quite sore for a couple days after fighting with the control arms....prying them out and also getting them back onto the ball joints and lined up properly once the bushings were in. Made me wish I had a lift in my garage.
     
  7. M1N1

    M1N1 Well-Known Member

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    #7 M1N1, Apr 17, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2015
    Fastlane - thank you for that. I have to admit that I am more concerned about the separation of the ball joints, and removal of the control arm than I am about the removal/replacement of the bushings.

    When I did a dry run, using the tool to remove a bushing from one of the used carriers that I bought, things went better than I hoped for. It took a bit of force to initially break the tension between the pressed in bushing and the carrier, but after that it came out relatively easily. Once the end cap "pulling" the bushing out had entered the carrier, things moved quite quickly. And this was done freehand on a bench, not held in a vice or bolted to the Coop. I just held the carrier down with one hand, and used a 24mm combination wrench with the other.
     
  8. Fastlane

    Fastlane Member

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    A whack with a big hammer took care of my ball joint except for one as I recall and I had to resort to using a pickle fork to separate it....ended up tearing the boot on it and had to go out and get a new ball joint to complete the job. I wouldn't worry about it too much. Ball joints are relatively cheap and readily available at Napa, etc....so if you damage one, it's not the end of the world.

    To get the arm out of the bushing, lots of prying is involved. The bigger the pry bar the better. One of mine was so stubborn that I resorted to heating it up and twisting the arm around until the bushing tore inside....then just had to knock the remaining sleeve off of the end of the arm. Not the ideal method, but I just couldnt pry it out on that side.
     

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